Anne Richardson

Month: April, 2018

Selected Films From The Minor Cinemas Of Oregon@Siren Theater, May 5, 2:00 PM

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On Saturday May 5, at 2:00 PM at the enchanting Siren Theater, 315 NW Davis, archivists Elizabeth Peterson, Libby Burke, and Dennis Nyback will present a screening of selected films from the minor cinemas of Oregon.

FILM #1

PLEASE NOTE: An unforeseen logistical problem means we will be screening another film in this time slot, not LUTHER METKE AT 94. The new title will be posted as soon as we confirm its availability.

Elizabeth Peterson will screen LUTHER METKE AT 94 (1979), directed by Jorge Preloren & Steve Raymen. 27 min, color, shot on 16mm.

“A portrait of Luther Metke who has lived in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon since 1907. Tells how he was a veteran of the Spanish American War, an early labor organizer, a poet, and a builder, and today serves as a vital and lucid example of the rural ethic in America.”

LUTHER METKE AT 94, an ethnographic film, comes from UO Libraries, where Elizabeth Peterson is Curator of Moving Images.

FILM #2

Libby Burke will screen THE CHANGING COLUMBIA (ca 1981), directed by Homer Groening. 27 min, color, shot on 16mm, color digitally restored by Gary Lacher.

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Bonneville Power Administration made several award-winning informational films from 1939 – 1987. “The Changing Columbia” came right after the passage of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act in 1980. To comply with its mandates, BPA promoted several programs to encourage consumers to conserve power, learn about alternatives like wind, solar, and energy efficiency. Homer Groening won the contract to explore these ideas in a film. It’s beautifully made, but was never distributed. To our knowledge, this is the first public screening of one of Homer Groening’s last films. Libby Burke

THE CHANGING COLUMBIA, a informational film, comes from the Bonneville Power Administration Library, where Libby Burke is archivist and film curator.

FILM #3

Dennis Nyback will screen THE CASE OF THE KITCHEN KILLER (1976), directed by Tim Smith. 21 min, color, shot on (and screened in) 16mm.

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“I was 17 years old when I got the idea for this film. Pat McCormick, writer and comic, once mentioned that one of the scariest times in his life was being a approached by a man brandishing a pair of kitchen tongs in the men’s restroom at New York’s Grand Central Station. This joke somehow morphed into an idea of a parody of crime drama’s dealing with the psychological angle.” Tim Smith

THE CASE OF THE KITCHEN KILLER, a low budget live action short, comes from Dennis Nyback Films, a private collection.

Nyback will also screen FOUR MEN TALKING ABOUT A BEER BOTTLE (1969), a regionally made industrial film, and a MYSTERY COMMERCIAL (1960s?), a regionally made television commercial, both from his collection.

Selected Films From The Minor Cinemas Of Oregon

May 5, 2018

2:00  PM- 4:00 PM

Siren Theater

315 NW Davis

Portland

Presented by Libby Burke, Elizabeth Peterson, & Dennis Nyback, with assistance from Brad Robison, as part of the fourth annual Oregon Film History Conference.

Open to the public

Admission $10

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Founded in 2007 by Anne Richardson and Dennis Nyback, Oregon Cartoon Institute uses new media, archival film, research, networking, and cross disciplinary discussion to explore Oregon film, animation, and print cartooning history. A 501c3 non profit organization, it has no brick and mortar presence, and always works in partnership with organizations which do.

 

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Radio historian Ron Kramer Leads Tour Of Jazz Age Portland/May 5, 10:00 AM

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Portland creatives resist arrest in this (staged) photo of the KGW Hoot Owls.

During the 1920s downtown Portland virtually crackled with energy soaked up by, and transmitted through, the new medium of radio.  Stylish hotels dotted the growing city and their dance bands were regularly broadcast – often by radio stations located in the same hotels.  Radio and movies hadn’t yet vanquished vaudeville and Portland’s numerous vaudeville theatres provided radio stations with major entertainers. 

Newspapers and department stores vied in launching their own stations – prompting the city fathers to create the Keep Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls – an international sensation.  And from this cauldron of creative energy Portland emerged as a vibrant and influential western American radio mecca which launched the career of many major entertainers.  Block by block radio unfolded and enveloped downtown Portland. 

Visit the locations, and hear stories, of the city’s Golden Radio Age on this downtown walking tour of those locales.

On May 5, at 10:00 AM, Ron Kramer leads his second radio history themed tour of downtown Portland.

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Ronald Kramer is the author of Pioneer Mikes: A History of Radio and Television in Oregon. He served as Executive Director of Jefferson Public Radio in Southern Oregon from 1974 to 2012 while also consulting for the Metropolitan Opera International Radio Network, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and other organizations.

Radio In Jazz Age Portland

Saturday May 5

10:00 AM – 11:30 AM

Meet in lobby of Embassy Suites, aka Multnomah Hotel

219 SW Pine

Led by radio historian Ron Kramer

$10

Mel Blanc credited his success in Hollywood to his experience as a performer on the KGW Hoot Owls, which broadcast out of the Oregonian Tower at SW 6th & Alder from 1922 to 1932. The Hoot Owls was a weekly variety show which combined live music, live comedy, and guest appearances by visiting show business celebrities. Mel Blanc became a Hoot Owl cast member in 1927, at age 19. Ten years later, he was making history at Warner Brothers.

When the Oregonian Tower went up in smoke in 1948, all the KGW archives documenting this chapter in Portland entertainment history were destroyed. Ron Kramer used his access to the only remaining private archive of Hoot Owl scripts to construct his understanding of what went on that small broadcasting studio.

Other show business careers which came out of Portland radio include self taught soulster Johnnie Ray, MGM sweetheart Jane Powell, and radio writer Harriet Frank Sr., mother of Academy Award nominated screenwriter Harriet Frank Jr.

Ron Kramer gives this tour as part of the fourth annual Oregon Film History Conference. The tour is open to the public! Just show up with $10, sensible shoes, and a willingness to be amazed.

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Founded in 2007 by Anne Richardson and Dennis Nyback, Oregon Cartoon Institute uses new media, archival film, research, networking, and cross disciplinary discussion to explore Oregon film, animation, and print cartooning history. A 501c3 non profit organization, it has no brick and mortar presence, and always works in partnership with organizations which do.